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MPAA, Cloud Experts Discuss Storage, Security

9 Apr, 2014 By: Chris Tribbey



LAS VEGAS — James Reavis, co-founder and CEO of the Cloud Security Alliance, looks at the rapid change the content industry has undergone when it comes to cloud storage and sees “a second industrial revolution.”

“I don’t think we understand the significance of what we’re seeing,” he said April 9, speaking at the NAB Show. Multiple vendors, multiple processes, multiple people across the world instantly sharing, editing and moving content, instantaneously, across cloud networks. However, the use of cloud services by content owners has grown so fast and so large, keeping all that content secure has become a massive challenge, he said.

“It’s important for us to understand that security is all of our responsibility [across the supply chain],” Reavis said. And with content security, it’s better to plan ahead, “instead of dealing with it when it’s already out there.”

He noted the unique situation Hollywood has with cloud storage: “There’s a point where you want it to be top secret, and then there’s a point where you don’t want it secret at all.” Keeping things under wraps until they’re not meant to be is the No. 1 priority.

Mark Hall, VP of content protection at Paramount Pictures, said the consumer demand for content across so many devices added a new challenge to content security and cloud storage for content owners, requiring more formats, codecs and files.

“It’s challenging, but it’s also exciting,” he said.

Hall offered the example of where cloud storage allows for animators living around the world could all work on the same project at the exact same time. That was unheard of just a few years ago.

“They don’t have to sit behind the gates at Paramount,” he said.

John McCoskey, EVP and CTO of the Motion Picture Association of America, said cloud storage has definitely forced content creators to change how they look at security.

“The good news is there are some good standards and practices out there, and we have a framework that is becoming more standardized,” he said.

Hall agreed, saying the days of production companies walking physical media from one place to the next are numbered. “We live in a connected world now, and we need to rethink that,” he said.

And when those pristine home entertainment version are released — and subsequently pirated — Hall said Hollywood could rest a little easier knowing the studios are still doing it better than the pirates.

“The good news is this is all about people wanting our content,” he added.

(L-R): Guy Finley, director of antipiracy affairs for the Content Delivery & Security Association; John McCoskey, EVP and CTO of the Motion Picture Association of America: James Reavis, co-founder and CEO of the Cloud Security Alliance; and Mark Hall, VP of content protection at Paramount Pictures.

 


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