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A Fair Exchange

25 May, 2015 By: Stephanie Prange

The May 2 Showtime pay-per-view fight between Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao may not have proved to be the most engaging live event ever, but it certainly made a bit of history in live Web broadcasting.

As the fight took place on pay-per-view, with many potential viewers fighting the rush in PPV traffic rather than watching a fight, Periscope members broadcast the event live from their cell phones. The Periscope service, which offers live streaming, shut down those “broadcasts” as soon as they were nabbed for piracy, according to Periscope executives. But the point — and the danger — was clear. Even live broadcasts, the last bastion of television, could be taken over by Internet video.

As observers in the home entertainment realm over the years, we’ve seen that access to content, other than that delivered by the studio at the theater or a broadcast service via the television, is desirable and profitable. Consumers crave control over what content they can access and when. That desire will never go away. But it’s up to content owners to extract a price for that access, for the fighters, players and actors, for the grips, for the directors, for the special effects team, for everybody who works to produce content.

Our annual Digital Drivers section attempts to outline and recognize some of those key players that are guiding that negotiation between content producers/owners and consumers. We are very proud of this piece, and hope it offers a bit of clarity in the murky digital future.

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