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'Walk Hard' DVD Bears Scores of Bonus Footage

15 Feb, 2008 By: Billy Gil


Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story


Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story parodies music biopics such as Ray and Walk the Line so gleefully, it's easy to miss the great music the film contains. Sung by lead actor John C. Reilly, Walk Hard's tunes meticulously emulate such music icons as Ray Charles, Roy Orbison and Johnny Cash.

“The real preparation was making the music for the movie,” Reilly said. “We recorded for about six months, recorded about 40 songs, 30 of which were original.”

Reilly did his own singing for the film, which is coming to video April 8 (prebook March 6) from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment on a two-disc unrated DVD ($29.96), single-disc rated DVD ($28.95), two-disc Blu-ray ($43.95) and UMD ($24.94).

Both the two-disc unrated DVD and the Blu-ray have a featurette on the music, song demos and added song performances. Both also include a commentary track with writer-director Jake Kasdan, writer-producer Judd Apatow, Reilly and producer Lewis Morton, deleted and extended scenes, commercials, a behind-the-scenes vignette and six more featurettes.

“When that DVD comes out, it'll keep you busy for a good three weeks,” Kasdan said.

The film's Jenna Fischer said the music plays a large part in the film's appeal.

“It's kind of like Spinal Tap in the way that they're real songs — they're not too jokey,” she said.

“[The unrated DVD] is half an hour longer and has entire portions of his life — extra wives, drug additions and [other] things — that aren't even in the theatrical version,” director Kasdan said.

Apatow, known for his involvement in a recent string of hits, from The 40-Year-Old Virgin to Superbad, said the process of pairing down films to manageable lengths involves his entire crew of friends.

“You start with a cut that's two and a half hours,” he said. “We'll show it to just some friends who can tolerate the length, and then a larger group of friends will look at the two-hour-and-15-minute version, and then once it gets under two hours, we'll show it to a real audience.”

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