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TV, Radio Ads Consumers' Primary Source for New-Release Info

11 Nov, 2004 By: Melinda Saccone


Consumers turn to TV ads and radio spots as their primary source of new DVD release information, but they rated video stores as their No. 2 source for finding out what's new on DVD.

Nearly two-thirds of all consumers first hear of new releases coming out on disc either on TV or radio, according to Video Store Magazine's 2004 Consumer Home Entertainment survey.

TV and radio were most likely to capture the attention of lower income households and the younger demographic, the survey revealed. Seventy percent of consumers under the age of 20 relied on TV and radio for new-release information. Nearly three-fourths of consumers with annual incomes of less than $20,000 cited TV and radio as their primary source for new-release information.

Video stores ranked second overall among consumers as to where they find out what is new on DVD, with one-fourth of consumers surveyed saying that is where they usually find out about new product. Video stores ranked higher as a source of information among consumers in their 40s and with those whose incomes are more than $60,000 than with the overall population.

Newspapers and magazines came in third for new DVD information, with 15 percent of consumers citing print media as their primary source to find out about new releases. However, for consumers who were in their 50s, that figure nearly doubled, with 26 percent citing newspapers and magazines as their primary source for new-release information.

The Internet and theatrical and video trailers tied for fourth, with 11 percent of consumers saying that was how they find out what's new on DVD.

High-volume buyers were more likely to find out about new releases at the video store than the overall population, with 31 percent of consumers who buy on average more than 20 discs per year saying that is where they usually find their information.

High-volume buyers were less likely to find out about new releases from TV or radio, with just more than half saying TV and radio were their primary information source. And they were nearly twice as likely to find out about new releases on the Internet than the overall population, with 20 percent pegging the Web as their primary source for new DVD information.

Gender also played a deciding role in where consumers found out about new movies coming to DVD. Men were nearly twice as likely to surf the Web for new-release information than women.

The number of DVD players owned and the length of ownership also affected where consumers got their information.

The more players owned and the longer a household has owned a DVD player, the less likely they were to obtain new-release information via TV and radio. This group was also more likely to use the Internet as a source of DVD information.

Multiplayer households were the least likely to obtain new-release information from TV or radio, with only 48 percent citing media as their primary source for new-release information. One-third of multiplayer households get their information from the video store, while 19 percent rely on the Internet.

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