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NCAA Fans Can Continue the Madness on DVD

30 Mar, 2005 By: Dan Bennett



It's March: a time when sports goes absolutely mad.

We're not talking anger, here. We're talking about March Madness, the nickname for the NCAA Basketball Tournament. The tournament is winding down, but fans of NCAA basketball can keep the madness going year-round with the new DVD game NCAA Basketball Trivia Challenge.

The title, available now for $24.95 at www.ncaatrivia.com, features thousands of clips of some of the great moments in college basketball history, including footage of star players such as Michael Jordan and Wilt Chamberlin. Using a DVD remote control, viewers can also engage in a comprehensive NCAA basketball trivia game, with the DVD keeping score.

“We made the first introduction at Toy Fair, and there was immediate interest,” said Nicholas Wodtke, CEO of the game's producer, Snap TV. “We've been able to place the title in so many different places, from Discovery Stores to Target.com, to multiple select retailers, and it's really creating a buzz.”

Putting together such a title is more complicated than people think, Wodtke says.

“The questions need to have appeal to sports fans and heavy-duty trivia buffs, but also appeal to the recreational fan,” Wodtke said. “These are questions written by sports writers and other authorities. The second challenge is finding the exact games and accompanying footage that answers those questions. These are games that go back 30 and 40 years, so that's a lot of research.”

The DVD game can be played by individuals, one-on-one or even at a party.

“When we designed the game, we designed it specifically so it could be played by an individual, but also serve as a great party game,” Wodtke said. “It's also designed so it can be played by a young fan or even someone in their 70s or 80s. With the ease of this game, even the tech-phobic can play.”

A new version will come out each year.

“We're getting good traction, in large part because DVD games are a massively growing retail segment,” Wodtke said.

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