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'Alexander,' 'Troy' Directors Sound Off on Director's Cuts

17 Sep, 2007 By: Chris Tribbey


Alexander director Oliver Stone and his son Sean, who directed a documentary featured on the Blu-ray and HD DVD releases of Alexander Revisited: The Final Cut.


BURBANK, Calif. — Oliver Stone swears this is the last version of Alexander. Really.

After theatrical and director's cuts, Stone has taken one last stab at the bio-epic tale he mulled over for years, giving us a 213-minute version in Alexander Revisited: The Final Cut.

“I promise you I won't be back,” he joked. “DVD has given me the freedom I hadn't had before. That was the right length for this movie, always was. [I'm] finally able to come to peace with myself with this script.”

Stone, his son Sean and Troy director, Wolfgang Petersen, spoke about the extended editions of their films at Warner Bros. Studios Sept. 17.

Stone began by showing media members three scenes in the new version, and discussed at length his reasons behind the cut.

“I could have never gotten this through the system,” Oliver Stone said. “It would have been a scandal … I don't think I'd be here right now.”

The Blu-ray and HD DVD version of Alexander Revisited: The Final Cut feature a full-length documentary created by Sean Stone.

“I was embarrassed at first,” Oliver Stone said of his son's documentary. “He was there at all times, hotel rooms … on the set.”

Sean Stone said: “The only thing I had as a model to plug into this was [a documentary about] Apocolypse Now.”

Petersen worked for nearly four months in the editing room to get the version of Troy he wanted.

“It was the best time in the editing room I had,” he said. “We couldn't wait every day to come to work.”

He had done a director's cut before the film was released theatrically, and this one is everything he wanted the public to see.

“This was to make it what originally it was supposed to be … this is an even bolder version than what we had with the original director's cut,” he said of the longer, sexier and more violent version, clocking in at 196 minutes.

Petersen said cutting down his original film for a theatrical audience, and to get the PG-13 rating necessary for a wider audience, was difficult. “I was crying while doing it,” he said, adding he felt pressured to make cuts he didn't want to. “I won't do that again.”

Now, with more character development, larger and longer battle scenes, the opening he wanted from day one, and more erotic sexual scenes, “Troy is a different movie.

“It feels much faster than the old one. It's there and nobody can take it away from me,” he said, adding, “Don't expect I'll have a director's cut of Poseidon. I won't.”

Troy: Director's Cut streets Sept. 18 as a two-disc special edition, an ultimate collector's edition, and on Blu-ray and HD DVD. Alexander streets the same day on Blu-ray, HD DVD and as a two-disc standard-edition set.

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