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Peep World (Blu-ray Review)

12 Jul, 2011 By: Ashley Ratcliff

Street 7/19/11
Box Office $0.01 million
$24.98 DVD, $29.98 Blu-ray
Not rated.
Stars Judy Greer, Michael C. Hall, Taraji P. Henson, Kata Mara, Ron Rifkin, Sarah Silverman, Ben Schwartz, Lesley Ann Warren, Rainn Wilson.

Peep World explores what happens when a writer’s tell-all book hits the bestseller list at the expense of his imperfect siblings, who cry foul when they’re portrayed as seriously flawed individuals. And the worst part: It’s all true.

The Lewis Black-narrated comedy opens up at a dinner celebrating the 70th birthday of the Meyerwitz family’s patriarch, Henry (Ron Rifkin). It’s obvious that no one wants to be there, and the tension erupts with one embittered outburst after another. Peep World then digresses into an illustration of the siblings’ vices and quirks, and what has led them to that heated moment.

Cheri (Sarah Silverman), the aspiring poet-dancer-actress-singer-songwriter, is in the process of suing Nathan, the youngest, most praised son, for the things he’s written about her, and she won’t rest until he pays for it.

Despite his newfound fame, Nathan’s insecure about his erectile dysfunction, and the experimental treatment he receives provides the intended comedic results.

Even more of a wreck is Joel (Rainn Wilson), the broke black sheep, who constantly relies on his family to bail him out. While his relatives deem him a loser, his girlfriend, Mary (Taraji P. Henson), constantly reassures him of his worth. An odd couple they make, indeed.

Dad-to-be Jack (Michael C. Hall), the “responsible” son, is feeling the strain from his family and failing business, and develops a porn addiction. Only when his wife (Judy Greer) finds out does Jack begin to address his problems head on.

While the Meyerwitz kids can’t stand that the book has ruined their lives, the siblings can bond over the mutual neglect from their wealthy father, whose success is the true apple of his eye. It’s nice to watch the drama of Peep World knowing that, by comparison, your family may not be as dysfunctional as you thought.

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