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Intruders (Blu-ray Review)

20 Jul, 2012 By: Maribel Castañeda

Box Office $0.07 million
$28.99 DVD, $29.99 Blu-ray
Rated ‘R’ for terror, horror violence, some sexuality/nudity and language.
Stars Clive Owen, Carice Van Houten, Daniel Brühl.

While most Hollywood thrillers follow the same formula — villain, victims, heroes and justice — Intruders changes the game by being a family movie disguised as a psychological thriller.

Director Juan Carlos Fresnadillo (28 Weeks Later) creates a world in which fantasy and reality mix, leaving viewers at the edge of their seats, not in suspense but in need of answers.

The story jumps between Juan (Izán Corchero), who lives in Madrid with his mother, and Mia (Ella Purnell), who lives in London with her parents. Both are haunted in their dreams by Hollowface, a faceless man desperate for love … and a face.

At first the plot seems weak. A faceless man wouldn’t make my list of scariest monsters. His first appearance at Juan’s bedroom is laughable at best. The red jacket he wears floats in midair as his shapeless body resembles a lighter version of a “Harry Potter” dementor, a cloak just floating around hungry for children.

The plot begins to gather more interest when Mia finds the story of Hollowface inside a tree and her encounters with him begin, with a much more realistic and terrifying version of Hollowface. As both children continue to write their version of Hollowface’s story, the terrors increase. John (Clive Owen), Mia’s father, embodies the role of a true father and fights endlessly to save his daughter — because he too can see Hollowface — before it’s too late.

Fresnadillo’s approach of slipping between fantasy and realism, with the added emotion of frantic parents willing to do whatever it takes to save their children, keeps viewers intrigued until the very end. Trying to put the puzzle pieces together as to how it all connects creates frustration, but the viewer is rewarded in the end with an unexpected twist to Hollowface’s origins. 

Intruders shows how far a child’s imagination can go.

About the Author: Maribel Castañeda

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