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Itty Bitty Titty Committee (DVD Review)

31 Aug, 2008 By: Laura Tiffany


Itty Bitty


Street 9/2/08
Wolfe
Comedy
Box Office $0.02 million
$27.95 DVD
Unrated.
Stars Melonie Diaz, Nicole Vicius, Melanie Mayron, Carly Pope, Daniela Sea, Guinevere Turner, Deak Evgenikos, Jenny Shimizu, Lauren Mollica.

Director Jamie Babbit's Itty Bitty Titty Committee is a frothy, romantic tale of what happens when a lesbian has come out but still doesn't fit in.

Anna (Diaz of Be Kind Rewind) is a young woman who hides behind too-long bangs and frumpy clothes. She didn't get into her first and only choice of college, and wiles away her time working at a plastic surgery clinic where her perky co-worker tells her to take advantage of their breast implants discount. Her first girlfriend has broken up with her, and her beautiful older sister is about to get married.

Then Anna meets Sadie (Vicius), a charismatic and beautiful feminist activist with a fatal flaw: She's tied to the apron strings of her much older girlfriend (Mayron of "Thirtysomething").

Anna dives into the activism scene — Sadie's group stages guerrilla art pranks — to be near Sadie, but finds her ideals and life shifting as she learns more about feminist and LGBT issues and about the different members in the group itself.

Committee doesn't feel as polished as Babbit's But I'm a Cheerleader, but it's got an energy and spark that feels authentic to the Los Angeles underground and this ragtag group of lesbians and feminists.

The soundtrack is impeccable, and the cast is equally top notch. Babbit does an excellent job casting strong, beautiful women as varied as they should be in a film of this nature, from butch lesbians and transgendered people to older women, women of color, and those who defy labels such as butch and femme.

After an ending that isn't nearly as revolutionary as it wants to be, Committee is outed as not saying a whole lot about anything — love is in the air instead of politics. Older women who've lived through this scene may find it too naïve and simple, but younger audiences will likely grab onto this enjoyable tale of a segment of society that doesn't often get its story told, especially given the buzz this film has built off Babbit's reputation and solid festival showings.


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